Old Burial Grounds, Female Academy and a Drive By a Haunted Inn

Yesterday I had a gig in Granville.  It is fortunate that I leave early to leave wiggle room in case there is an unexpected development (such as losing my bearings despite a GPS), because anyone who has ever known me would realize there was no way I was gonna drive by this without stopping.   Since there didn’t appear to be an open gate, I hopped over an enclosure (wearing my best clothing  – who cares?) and sneaked in.  Although subterfuge was probably not necessary, but it did add to the adventure.

This monument is visible from the street.

 


“The Old Colony Burying Ground has many signed and masterfully carved monuments and gravestones that provide a
history of gravestone motifs between 1808 and 1880. Found within this ground are excellent examples of the work of
local carvers and sculptors, including Thomas and Rollin Hughes, Manley Whipple, and the DeBow brothers. The early markers are of locally quarried sandstone, while many of the later ones are of marble, which was shipped to Granville via the Granville Feeder from the Ohio and Erie Canal. In 1886, Charles Webster Bryant recorded and numbered the location and epitaphs of all visible gravestones, providing important historic information no longer visible today. The cemetery has been called the Old Colony Burying Ground since 1912 when the wrought-iron entrance gates were erected by the Granville Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. The Old Colony Burying Ground was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. ”

Marker Number 21-45

 

Ah, the famous Buxton Inn.

http://www.ohioghosthunter.com/ghosts_at_buxton__inn_granville_ohio.html


Markers in downtown Granville.


This was new to me.


The Granville Congregational Church erected this building in 1833 for its Female Academy and a church meeting room. The school prospered and, in 1837, moved to make way for the Granville Male Academy. The Welsh Congregational Church purchased the structure in 1863 and converted its two stories into a single room with full-height windows. Welsh language services were held here for sixty years. Granville Grange #2230 met in the building from 1923 to 1973. It then became Granville Historical Society’s property and, in 1981, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Opponents to slavery met at the academy during the 1830s and 1840s. In 1834, Theodore Weld, a zealous abolitionist, proclaimed his then radical views here. A mob gathered outside and pelted Weld through the windows with eggs. In 1841, a dramatic trial within these walls contested whether a runaway slave could be extradited from Ohio and returned to the south. Judge Samuel Bancroft ruled that Ohio’s extradition law was unconstitutional. The partisan crowd ushered the man to a waiting horse and he hurried north.

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